Private Home Tutoring Woolloomooloo

HOME TUTORING WOOLLOOMOOLOO

Welcome to Top of the Class Professional Tuition Woolloomooloo NSW

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Welcome to Top of the Class Home Tuition Woolloomooloo

Open Until 7PM Weekdays

Open Until 7PM Weekdays

The office staff who answer calls are all experienced tutors.

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FIRST CHILDS DETAILS

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SECOND CHILDS DETAILS

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THIRD CHILDS DETAILS

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FOURTH CHILDS DETAILS

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Which of the following describe the most common problems you've found to be holding your child back from reaching their full potential:

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WHAT ELSE SHOULD WE KNOW?

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DO OUR PARENT TRAINING COURSE

By Stuart Adams Life Coaching Sydney

OUR APPROACH

COGNITIVE INTELLIGENCE

LEARNING

Your private Woolloomooloo home tutor will establish the specific way that your child learns best and will adjust their teaching methods to suit your child's pesonal learning style.

UNDERSTANDING

Your child's private tutor in Woolloomooloo will apply constructivist teaching methods to build understanding step by step with greater ease.

THINKING

Your child's Woolloomooloo tutor will use Higher Order Thinking Skills to explore new concepts progressively deeper through analysing, evaluating and creating.

APPLICATION

Your Woolloomooloo private tutor will focus on fine tuning your child's time management and organisational skills to be more prepared for upcoming assesements.

EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE

STRENGTHS

Your personal tutor Woolloomooloo will identify your child’s personal strengths and use them to overcome their personal weaknesses so they can reach their full potential.

PASSION

To make learning more engaging, your private home tutor Woolloomooloo will appeal to your child's personal likes and interests to stimulate their passion for learning.

CONFIDENCE

Your private tutor Woolloomooloo will utilise strategic goal setting and a strong focus on progress to build confidence and drive them to be more motivated!

AUTONOMY

Your Woolloomooloo home tutoring coach will teach your child to become more self-disciplined through reflective practice by learning from their own mistakes.

The Parent Blog

FREE ONLINE PARENT COACHING SESSION

During the 1960’s a famous documentary series interviewed 7 year olds from a range of different family background to get a ‘snapshot’ about their life. They then followed them up every 7 years into their adolescence and adult years as well. This series showed us that whatever we’re exposed to during our environment growing up tends to mould us. We then go on to recreate similar patterns for the rest of our life.

Many parents get to the stage where they realise that the problems they feel ‘stuck’ with have come about as a result of environmental influences they were exposed to during their developmental years. They become especially stressed when they realise that they have been inadvertently replicating some of those problems and want to protect their children so that they do not repeat the same cycle. Many parents come to us for help wanting to know how to create better environmental foundations for their children to provide them with better opportunities moving forward into an ever increasingly competitive world.

In this lesson, Stuart reveals one simple trick that Harvard Psychology Researchers have identified when it comes to creating positive change in a child’s environment. In this lesson you’ll learn what that simple trick is. When you realise this, you’ll become clearer about how to implement the right strategies to have a positive impact on your child’s environment to give them the best foundation during their developmental learning years.

Studies have shown that whatever we’re exposed to during our environment growing up tends to mould us. We then go on to recreate similar patterns for the rest of our life. In this lesson, Stuart reveals one simple trick that Harvard Psychology Researchers have identified when it comes to creating positive changes in a child’s environment to give them the best foundation during their developmental learning years.

Exercise Questions

1. How has your child learned to feel towards thing like reading, writing, maths and other academic skills?

2. What changes would you like to help your child develop in the way that they see themselves?

3. What are your major concerns about your child’s future and what specific opportunities would you like them to have better access to?


The famous candle problem psychological experiment showed us that when we have the potential to succeed, we also have the potential to fail. Children become aware that the classroom is a competitive environment where some children perform better than others. This has a big impact on whether they learn to feel confident or not as it creates pressure. Under the pressure of competitive conditions, children can either become more motivated or become more resistant depending on how confident they have learned to feel towards their abilities.

In this lesson, Stuart reveals the fundamental formula which can either make or break the extent to which we feel motivated. This formula is all about the relationship between pressure and confidence, and explains why people tend to build on their strengths but avoid their weaknesses. He finishes the lesson by revealing what specific aim we need to achieve in order to help children develop their confidence in the specific skills that will be most beneficial to their development.

In this lesson, Stuart reveals the 3 step motivation formula which was discovered following the famous ‘candle problem’ psychological experiments. It all comes down to the relationship between pressure and confidence. This formula explains why people tend to build on their strengths but avoid their weaknesses. Finally, he reveals what specific aim we need to achieve in order to help our children develop their confidence so that the pressure of the increasingly competitive world doesn't hold them back.

Exercise Questions

1. What are your child’s weaknesses (specifically, the things they show resistance towards or struggle to motivate themselves to do).

2. In what ways do you think that their environmental influences contributes towards pressure which may be making it difficult for them to build their confidence.

3. How do you think you might be able to communicate with them differently in order to both a) take the pressure off whilst b) creating an awareness of progress to build their confidence.


In this lesson, Stuart explains that the brain evolved from the inside out. We still have primitive instincts driving out thoughts and feelings - especially when we’re feeling threatened or under pressure. It’s just for the most part we are unconscious of them. These inner more primitive parts of the brain are very emotionally immature and processes reality in terms of all or nothing. This is why learning new skills and building confidence is much harder under pressure.

When children fail to exercise the more sophisticated layers of the brain, it conditions them with a fixed mindset. Children with a fixed mindset are more likely to resist unfamiliarity out of fear of failure, and will regress if they don’t do well. This makes them more likely to stay stuck in their comfort zone and less likely to build confidence. When children exercise the more sophisticated layers of the brain however, it creates a growth mindset which enables them to be more receptive to challenges and bounce back harder following failure.

In this lesson, Stuart reveals how the way that we can use praise can either stimulate the inner part of the brain and create a fixed mindset, or stimulate the outer brain to create a growth mindset. He also explains that the way we are both praised or criticised as a child tends to stay stuck in out mind, and we go on to praise or criticism ourselves the same way which reinforces the mindset we grow up with. This makes it all the more important to understand what to say and what not to say when communicating to our children.

In this lesson, Stuart explains that the human brain evolved from the inside out. The outer, more sophisticated layers process things like literacy and numeracy but the inner primitive parts control our instincts. He also explains that the way we are both praised or criticised as a child tends to stay stuck in out mind. Finally, he reveals how to praise children in a way that exercises the more sophisticated layers of the brain in order to create a 'growth mindset’ rather than simulating the inner layers which keep them stuck with a ‘fixed mindset’.

Exercise Questions

1. Under what conditions do you think trigger your ‘inner brain’ to activate more and how does your thinking change when you’re feeling under pressure.

2. Think of the last few times you have praised your child. What did you praise them for and how do you work the praise?

3. How do you think you might be able to use praise differently in order to create a growth mindset in your child?


In this lesson, Stuart explains the important role of choosing what things to focus our attention on and what things to let go of. When we focus on things beyond out control it stimulates the inner brain which contributes to a fixed mindset. To exercise a mature growth mindset however we need to direct attention towards things within our control. Praise is a powerful director of attention for children, however Stuart describes numerous other ways in which the way we communicate with children directs their attention either towards more or less helpful things.

Stuart also explains that it’s normal for thoughts of self doubt to pop into our mind when we stretch out of our comfort zone to walk into the face of uncertainty such as facing our weaknesses. This is our minds way to distract us away from vulnerable feelings. He goes onto explain that in order to become more emotionally intelligent, we need to learn how to challenge our own thinking and seperate the ‘reals from the feels’.

Once we improve the interpersonal skills of self-awarenss, it tends to improve our interpersonal skills of social awareness. These emotional intelligence skills are more strongly linked with success than intellectual intelligence alone, and are therefore skills that we need to improve upon as parents in order to help our children develop those skills as well.

In this lesson, Stuart explains that Emotional Intelligence (EQ) is a stronger predictor of career success among school leavers than Intellectual Intelligence and Academic Achievements. He reveals some of the most fundamental cognitive skills that young learners need to develop in order to be more self disciplined. He also explains what EQ is, and how we can provide an environment for our children which improves both their interpersonal and intrapersonal skills as well as our own in the process.

Exercise Questions

1. What things have you been focusing on that are outside of your control and what can you redirect your focus towards instead?

2. What thoughts ‘pop into your mind’ when you are outside of your comfort zone and how can you better respond to them when they do?

3. Now that you have a better awareness of the defence mechanisms young learners are likely to demonstrate when feeling vulnerable, how can you better respond to your child in order to get past those defence mechanisms?


In our final days, it becomes clearer to us that the most important role of our lives is our role as a parent. Because we naturally tend to replicate our own childhood conditioning, many parents get stuck when trying to figure out how to do a better job than their own parents did.

In this final conclusion, Stuart reveals the starting point that you’ll need to work on if your aim is to improve your communication as a parent. If you’d like to get started and learn some simple strategies to improve your intra-personal skills and become more self aware, just go ahead and click the button below that says ‘get started’ to begin Stuart's Life Coaching Sydney course for parents.

In this final conclusion, Stuart reveals the starting point that you’ll need to work on if your aim is to improve your communication as a parent. If you’d like to get started and learn some simple strategies to improve your intra-personal skills and become more self aware, just go ahead and click the button below that says ‘get started’ to begin Stuart's course for parents

OTHER EBOOKS

Below are a selection of eBooks and audiobooks on various topics relating to mental health, by Top of the Class founder Stuart Adams who is a School Teacher, Careers Advisor and Psychotherapist Sydney.